Helping Children with Dental Pain

There’s nothing worse than watching your child suffer in pain and not knowing how to help. Dental pain can often be an excruciating experience, with a list of possible causes.

Luckily, as adults, we are able to identify the pain quickly and know where to go for a solution. However, for a young child it’s not so easy, as to them a toothache or dental infection is never ending torture.

Toothaches are often caused by the erosion or decay of the tooth’s pulp chamber, used for storing sensitive nerves and minuscule blood vessels. Snacking on fizzing drinks and sugar-filled foods can contribute to toothaches and may be the cause of your child’s dental pain.

Pain can also be caused by a dental infection and there are lots of warning signs to watch out for, such as:

  1. Teeth darkening in colour
  2. Red gums or swelling to the gyms, neck or jaw
  3. Experiencing pain or sensitivity when chewing
  4. Loss of appetite and weight
  5. Bitter taste in mouth with bad breath
  6. Sickness including nausea, fever, chills, vomiting and diarrhoea

All can be an unpleasant discomfort, but there are ways to help soothe the pain.

First of all, it’s best to book a dental appointment as soon as possible. But in the meantime we recommend rinsing your child’s mouth out with warm salt water (please ensure it’s warm and not hot). You can also provide over-the-counter child pain medication to ease the ache or apply a cold compress, such as an ice-wrapped cloth, to their face beside the source of pain.

Avoid aggressing brushing and flossing of their teeth and gums, advise them not to wriggle the tooth too much and do not hesitate to see the dentist, although you should already be having regular appointments to spot early signs.

Here at Riverside Dental Spa our dentistry professionals are here to protect your family’s oral health. Whether you’re looking for a regular check up or to treat a toothache or similar discomfort, get in touch with our friendly team today on 0800 0154 222.

For life-threatening emergencies, always call 999 or go straight to your local hospital A&E centre.

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